Misplaced Adjectives and Nouns: Grammar Does Matter

“Mom, how do I make the word ‘humble’ a noun?” “What about ‘splendid’?” My fifth grader had come to me for help on her grammar homework. Humble, humbly, humility… three very similar words… Continue reading

Facilitating Student Gender Diversity

Higher education systems are increasingly examining the systems in place to support students who are living as a gender other than their birth sex or who identify as genderqueer or another identity outside… Continue reading

Facilitating Diversity in Higher Education

While the lack of diversity in higher education is not news (and we’ve posted about it here before: Diversity in Higher Education), per se, Marketplace just did a piece on diversity among university… Continue reading

Mad About Millennials

Millennials, people born between 1982 and 2004, compose the bulk of our student population.  Millennials have been characterized as: Special/Narcissistic – a feeling promoted by doting parents/grandparents and an “every one wins” mentality… Continue reading

Pedagogical Strategies to Promote Diversity Skills

As we approach the beginning of another semester and I work on creating a new course, this moment presents itself as a great opportunity to think about how I deal with diversity in… Continue reading

Checking Ourselves: Political Opinion in the Classroom

“…There is a shift in which universities are trying to be politically correct, but the contradictory discourse conversations may be lacking. I am concerned that being too politically correct in the classroom may… Continue reading

Allowing humbug in the classroom: Acknowledging diversity in thinking

In the beginning of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol (1843), Ebenezer Scrooge has the divergent opinion that Christmas is nothing but a humbug and that charity to others is worthless.  Although, Scrooge changes… Continue reading

College Students Plus Homelessness Equals?

With Thanksgiving approaching, I offer this experience. I was walking with a faculty colleague across campus and I encountered a 19-year-old African-American female student that I had last year in class.  The young… Continue reading

Rude Foreigners

“The French are always so rude!” This was the response I received after talking about the different people I met during a trip to Austria. Why do the French get such a bad… Continue reading

Diversity in College Admissions: Does Affirmative Action Have a Place?

Often, university faculty are involved in the graduate admissions process. We strive to be “diversity” blind, recommending applicants based on their individual academic and civic merits rather than ancestry, socioeconomic status, or gender.… Continue reading

Cultural Incompetence: Responsibility to Respond or Not?

Below is a fictional scenario presented by one of the faculty members of the School of Human Service Professions: A few days ago as I was walking to my office in Bruce Hall, I… Continue reading

Who is Qualified to Teach About Cultural Sensitivity?

Through the process of writing in this blog, I began to think about our responsibility as educators to instill change and to plant the seeds for consideration of a different path and a… Continue reading

Diversity in Higher Education

“Oh my goodness, It’s you!” The student exclaimed, her eyes wide with excitement. After getting lost on her way to another building, the young woman had unknowingly knocked on the door of the… Continue reading

More than a Cast

Life changed in a split second.  A freak accident led to 4 broken bones in the right foot, a fiberglass cast, crutches, no weight permitted on the right foot, a “knee walker”, and… Continue reading

Handling Difficult Situations with Mindful Inquiry

A chapter I recently read on handling diversity in the classroom ended with: “sensitivity alone is insufficient to deliver a quality curriculum” (Davis-Russell, 2007). This observation resonated with me, as a relative newcomer… Continue reading

I Don’t See Color. I See People.

The following is a piece that I included in my chapter (CH 3: The Interaction of Cultures, Sexuality, and Social Work Practice.) for the textbook cited below. It has been a helpful way… Continue reading

Suporting Victims of Sexual Violence on Campus

These articles provide information related to the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act (SaVE). The first is purely informative in terms of helping students understand the rights and expectations of institutions in terms of… Continue reading

Do You Typecast?

Is there such as thing as a harmless stereotype? Do you typecast? Match the word on the left to the word/phrase often associated with it on the right. Homosexual Good at sports, dancing… Continue reading

Trigger Warnings in the Classroom

This article raises important questions about the seemingly benign practice of giving a “trigger warning” prior to a film, lecture with slides, or even a syllabus. It’s worth a read so that we… Continue reading

Course on Nontraditional Families

For the past five or so years, I have been doing research in the area of adoptive families. My work culminated in a co-edited volume Working with adoptive parents: Research, theory, and therapeutic… Continue reading

Drug Courts: Fair Courts?

Work in the School of Human Services Professions allows us wonderful opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration. Beyond this, students dually enrolled in programs at Widener, such as PsyD and Criminal Justice or MSW and… Continue reading

Religious Pluralism

The movement to shift the discourse from diversity to pluralism in its essence is designed to value the multicultural aspects that enrich the student bodies of many colleges and universities. In the 2007… Continue reading

I Wish I was a Minority

Have you heard remarks like these in your classroom? Maybe during a discussion on race, a white student notes that if only she were in the minority, then she would have more scholarships… Continue reading

A Weighty Issue

When discussing diversity and discrimination on a college campus, or anywhere in the US, the topic of weight is not one that immediately comes to mind. Yet, weight is an area of prejudice… Continue reading

Sometimes a Bridge is Better

Few can argue that the world is becoming more diverse and that success in life may rely on our ability to connect with others and be “politically correct”. The challenge lies in opening… Continue reading

Recent Events on Campus – Prayer at Widener Ceremonies

Prayer at Widener Ceremonies: SHSP Deans’ Luncheon Conversation On November 26th, 2012, thirteen faculty members attended the SHSP Dean’s Diversity Luncheon to discuss the issue of prayer at Widener ceremonies, and in particular,… Continue reading

Recent Research

In a 2009 article published in Counseling Psychologist, Sue et al present findings from their study of how White faculty members perceive and react to difficult classroom dialogues about race. It includes suggestions… Continue reading

What would you do?

Your physical therapy student is sharing his experience after just returning from a clinical affiliation.  He had been gaining independence as a student PT to the point where his clinical instructor gave him… Continue reading